Graduate Courses

COURSE DESCRIPTION, PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES

PCL1001Y (Y): Systems Pharmacology

Coordinator: Drs. Michelle Arnot and Peter McPherson

Fall 2020

Mondays, 2:00 - 4:00 pm;
Wednesdays, 11:00 am - 1:00 pm;
online synchronous

Winter 2021

Mondays, 2:00 - 4:00 pm;
Wednesdays, 10:00 am - noon;
online synchronous

This is a comprehensive pharmacology course covering concepts of drug properties and interactions with living systems. Students will attend lectures examining mechanisms of action, clinical use, and adverse effects of drugs acting on the nervous (autonomic and central), cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, immunological and endocrine systems. Endogenous compounds, antimicrobial drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, chemotherapy, and other special topics will also be discussed. Critical evaluation of primary literature and examination of clinical problem-based case studies will be integrated with lecture material through writing assignments and small group sessions.

  • Students are expected to have a general background in biology, biochemistry, pharmacology and/or physiology.
  • Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Applied Clinical Pharmacology field of study.
  • Non-Pharmacology graduate students may request this course via an Add/Drop Course form. A complete transcript must accompany the form.

PCL1002Y (Y): Graduate Pharmacology

Coordinator: Dr. D. Riddick

Fall 2020 - Winter 2021
Fridays, 10:00 am - noon;
online synchronous

A series of lectures and student presentations that emphasize recent advances in our understanding of pharmacological principles. Areas covered include drug metabolism, molecular biology, pharmacogenomics, receptors & signal transduction, clinical pharmacology, and behavioural pharmacology. Each student presents a critical evaluation of a recent research paper during the year. Testing will be in-class exam format and completion of a CIHR-style operating grant application.

PCL1003Y (Y): Seminars in Pharmacology

Coordinator: Dr. P. McPherson

Continuous course
Tuesdays, 3:00 - 5:00 pm;
online synchronous

Seminars are given by invited external speakers, Department faculty members and doctoral students. Although students are not expected to attend every seminar, a minimum attendance level of 50 seminars is required, to receive course credit, and students will be penalized for a poor attendance record. The penalty will be essay assignment(s) on seminar topics that the student has missed. Additional requirements for this course are the presentation of two Departmental seminars during the course of the PhD program.

  • Open to Pharmacology PhD students only.
  • No formal grade is assigned to PCL1003Y. It is a Credit/Non-Credit course.

PCL1004Y (Y): Clinical Pharmacology

Coordinator: Dr. C. Woodland

Fall 2020 - Winter 2021
Thursdays, 11:00 am - 1:00 pm;
online synchronous

This  course  explores  a  variety  of  topics  in  clinical  pharmacology  with  emphasis  on  the application  of  pharmacokinetic  principles. Clinical  cases  are  used  to  highlight  a  breadth of topics  in  clinical pharmacology  and  toxicology including variability in drug response, adverse drug reactions, clinical study design, and pharmacoeconomics.

PCL1100H F: Applied Skills in Clinical Pharmacology

Coordinator: Dr. Nicole Mittmann

May - June 2020
Tuesdays and Thursdays,
10:00 am - noon;
online synchronous

This course introduces fundamental principles of clinical research and provides students with the skills necessary for the design, execution, analysis, and critical evaluation of clinical studies in pharmacology. Students will become familiar with various research approaches, methodologies, and strategies commonly employed in clinical pharmacology. Specifically, lectures will cover observational and experimental study designs and techniques; clinical data measurements, collection, and analysis; evidence review (systematic reviews/meta-analysis); ethical, legal, and regulatory guidelines governing clinical research; safety monitoring and adverse event reporting (pharmacovigilance); and key principles of pharmacoeconomics. In addition, students will be introduced to current topics and conceptual issues related to clinical research in pharmacology, and will learn to critically appraise clinical research.

  • Restricted to students enrolled in the Applied Clinical Pharmacology field of study only.

PCL1101H F: Technology, Techniques and Translation in Pharmacology & Toxicology

Coordinator: Dr. Walter Swardfager

May - June 2020
Tuesdays and Thursdays,
1:00 - 3:00 pm;
online synchronous

This series of interactive seminars and workgroups will explore methodologies relevant to the translation of molecular discoveries into clinical studies, and vice versa, through examples in select disease areas. We will examine techniques and technologies for in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo modeling of disease, drug action, and drug disposition. Methodologies enabling the measurement of surrogate outcomes including biomarkers from blood samples and clinical imaging modalities will be explored. Students will learn how clinical trials and alternative sources of data including consortia databases and public health records can be used to evaluate the benefits and adverse consequences of pharmacological treatment. Both commonly applied statistical methods and novel/alternative approaches to data analysis will also be considered.

  • Restricted to students enrolled in the Applied Clinical Pharmacology field of study only.

PCL1300H: Selected Topics in Clinical Pharmacology

Coordinator: Dr. C. Woodland

Winter 2021
TBC

 

PCL1402H (F): Pharmacology & Toxicology in Drug Development

Coordinator: Dr. R. Laposa

Fall 2020
Lectures: online asynchronous

Tutorials: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm;
MSB2377 or online synchronous

The aim of this course is to provide instruction on the basic principles of drug development, with a primary focus on the application of fundamental principles of pharmacology and toxicology to the design and conduct of early phase clinical trials. Students will become familiar with the standard safety and pharmacokinetic assessments that take place during early clinical development, as well as with proof-of-concept and proof-of-mechanism studies, evaluations of exposure- toxicity relationships and refinement of dose selection for later phase trials. In addition to actual clinical studies, the course will examine various modeling approaches that are also conducted during drug development. At the end of the course, students should understand the phases of drug development, be able to design an early phase clinical study, understand the standardized practices and ethical implications of clinical research, and be aware of some of the scientific and non-scientific career paths/roles in drug development.

  • Restricted to students enrolled in the Applied Clinical Pharmacology field of study only.

PCL1491H (S): Clinical Pharmacology: Principles in Practice

Coordinator: Dr. A. Hamadanizadeh

TBC

The overall goal of this laboratory course is to provide students with practical experience and understanding of experimental methods used in clinical pharmacology research. The 12-session course will be taught through a combination of wet labs and dry labs. During wet labs, groups (~3-5 individuals per group) will be given a drug that they will investigate in the laboratory. Dry labs will involve lectures, case studies, and assignments. Topics will include assessments of drug solubility, absorption/bioavailability and bioequivalence, distribution and protein binding, biotransformation, renal excretion, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics modeling, drug-drug interaction, and assessment of pharmacodynamic effects.

  • Students are expected to have a general background in biology, biochemistry, pharmacology and/or physiology.
  • Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Applied Clinical Pharmacology field of study.
  • Non-Pharmacology graduate students may request this course via a Add/Drop Course form. A complete transcript must accompany the form.

PCL2200Y (Y): Major Research Project

Coordinator: Dr. C. Woodland

Continuing course throughout ACP program

The aim of this course is to give students an opportunity to conduct independent research in pharmacology. Students will be matched to faculty members who will supervise their project and provide guidance and assistance. Students will be required to apply their knowledge of pharmacology and research methodologies. This course will allow students to acquire important practical skills, in-depth knowledge of the research subject, and develop scientific communication skills.

  • Enrolment in this course is automatic for all students enrolled in the Applied Clinical Pharmacology field.
  • Pre-/ Co-requisite: PCL1100H.

JNP1014Y (Y): Interdisciplinary Toxicology

Coordinator: Dr. Peter McPherson

Fall 2020 - Winter 2021

Tuesdays, 9:00 am - noon;
online synchronous

A survey course examining several contemporary topics in toxicology with emphasis on human/mammalian toxicology. Topics in the course may include: adverse drug reactions, acute poisonings, natural toxins, maternal-fetal toxicology, forensic toxicology, environmental chemistry, pesticides, dioxins, endocrine disruptors, regulatory toxicology, occupational toxicology, food toxicology, herbal products, alcohol, smoking, and drugs of abuse. Students are evaluated by their performance on written tests and assignments.

  • Recommended Preparation: BCH210H, PCL201H,  PCL302H, PCL362H, or their equivalents.

JNP1016H: Graduate Seminar in Toxicology

Coordinator: Dr. Cindy Woodland

May - June 2020

Weds & Fri, 10 am - noon; 
online synchronous

This course is a seminar-based course in which students critique scientific papers in the area of toxicology. Faculty members from a wide variety of disciplines will guide these sessions and give an overview of the relevant issues in the field. Students are evaluated by oral and written critiques of the scientific literature and by their participation in class discussions. This is a compulsory course for all MSc and PhD students in the Collaborative Program in Biomedical Toxicology. It is also open to other qualified graduate students if space permits.

JPM1005Y (Y): Behavioral Pharmacology

Coordinator: Dr. L. Zawertailo
Offered alternate years

Wednesdays, 3:00 - 5:00 pm

The goal of this course is to examine the methodologic and experimental basis of studying the effects of drugs on behaviour. Throughout the course the relationship of pre-clinical behavioural pharmacology to human behavioural pharmacology is compared. There will be a strong emphasis on how behavioural studies can assist in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and identification of novel therapeutic approaches for various mental illnesses and addictions. In the first part of the course, general background covering the principles of behavioural pharmacology will be covered. This approach ensures that students somewhat weaker in relevant areas of psychology or pharmacology are able to gain such knowledge early in the course. In the second part of the course, there is a focus on selected topics and current experimental issues in the field including several chosen by the class. Instruction will include a 45 minute overview of the topic given by the lecturer followed by a discussion of two research papers provided one week in advance. Structured questions are provided to guide preparation and discussion. An opportunity to observe/participate in some of the behavioural techniques described in the class will be offered.

JNP1017H (F): Current Topics in Molecular and Biochemical Toxicology

Coordinator: Dr. J. Henderson
Offered alternate years
 

This course will emphasize the biochemical principles and mechanisms underlying the toxicity of drugs and foreign agents. In particular the current hypotheses that explain the events at the molecular level which determine and affect toxicity are examined and critically evaluated. This course is suitable for graduate students of pharmacy, toxicology, pharmacology, biochemistry, environmental science, pathology, neuroscience and medical biophysics. A weekly journal club will also be held after the lectures.

  • Permission of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department is required.

JNP1018H (F): Molecular and Biochemical basis of Toxicology I

Coordinator: Dr. J. Henderson
Offered alternate years

This course will emphasize the molecular biology principles and mechanisms underlying the toxicity of drugs and foreign agents. A journal club format is used to examine and critically evaluate the current hypotheses that explain the events at the molecular level which determine and affect toxicity. This course is suitable for graduate students of pharmacy, toxicology, pharmacology, biochemistry, environmental science, pathology, neuroscience and medical biophysics. A weekly journal club will also be held after the lectures.

  • Permission of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department is required.
  • JNP1017H is not a prerequisite for this course.

JFK1120H (F): Selected Topics in Drug Development I

Coordinator: Dr. M. Piquette-Miller and Dr. C. Allen

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to general research and drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Lectures will focus on government regulations, phase I through phase IV studies, marketing and quality control requirements in new drug approval. The course format is a combination of lectures given by faculty, specialist in the pharmaceutical industry and workshops.

  • Permission of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department is required.

JFK1121H (S): Selected Topics in Drug Development II

Coordinator: Dr. S.Wu and Dr. P. Lee
Offered alternate years

This course provides an in-depth examination of several issues facing the pharmaceutical scientists. Students will be required to apply fundamental principles of pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics to current problems that are being faced in the pharmaceutical industry. Contemporary issues in pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics will be covered. The course format is a combination of lectures given by faculty, specialist in the pharmaceutical industry and workshops.

  • Prerequisite: JFK1120H.
  • Permission of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department is required.

JFK1122H (F): Drug Transport Across Biological Membranes

Coordinator: Dr. R. Bendayan
Offered alternate years

The course is to provide graduate students with a knowledge of the molecular entities involved in drug transport across biological cell membranes and to emphasize the physiological and clinical significance of these entities. The course will consist of didactic lectures presented in a traditional lecture format, and student presentations, when appropriate a lecture will be replaced by a research seminar.

  • Permission of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department is required.

JNR1444Y (Y): Fundamentals of Neurological Science*

Coordinator: Dr. James Eubanks

Fall 2020 - Winter 2021
Tuesdays, 4:30 - 7:30 pm
 

The purpose of this course is to give undergraduate students an overview and grounding in the fundamentals of neuroscience. The main emphasis is on the cellular and molecular aspects of brain function. The lecturers, all experts in their respective topics, are drawn from the different university departments and associated research institutes. Each year the course is updated to reflect the rapid evolution of ideas in neuroscience.

This course is open to both graduate and senior undergraduate students, however, it is a rigorous course that has been primarily designed for graduate students. To facilitate extensive student-instructor interaction, enrollment will be capped.

  • *This course is also offered as two half-year courses worth a half credit each. See PSL1445H and PSL1446H.
  • Permission of the Physiology Department is required.

JYG1555H (S): Advanced Topics: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

Coordinator: Dr. L-Y Wang
Offered alternate years

Winter 2021
Mondays, 1:00 - 4:00 pm;
MS 3227

This course focuses upon selected topics in molecular genetics and cellular neurobiology. Students will be expected to make presentations based upon appropriate recent literature. Participation in discussions will also be required. There will be no didactic lectures. Presentation topics will be chosen from four broad areas of neurobiology; signaling in cells of the nervous system, development of cells of the nervous system, plasticity of the nervous system and molecular genetics of neural diseases.

  • Permission of the Physiology Department is required.